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BA in Mass Communication 

Program Requirements

The B.A. in Mass Communication degree requires the completion of 120 credits in the following areas of study:

Degree Requirements Credits
I. University General Education Requirements 31
II. Department/Program Core Course Requirements 32
(Digital Media or Public Relations) Compulsory Courses 18
III. Modern Language and Culture Competency Requirement 15
IV. Concentration Electives 12
V. Free Electives 9
VI. Internship 3
Total 120

I. University General Education Requirements (31 Credits)

Compulsory

Core Courses (22 Credits)

Code Course Title Credits
ENGL 101 Composition 3
ENGL 200 Advanced Composition 3
PHIL 100 Critical Thinking and Reasoning  3
ITEC 103 Fundamentals of Information Technology  3
MATH 101 Numbers and Data Interpretation 3
MEST 100 Introduction to Islam in World Culture  3
UNIV 100 University Freshman Transition 1
UNIV 200 Innovation, Entrepreneurship and Sustainability 3

Electives

Arts and Humanities Elective (3 Credits)

ARTT 100 Introduction to Visual Arts 3
ARAB 110 Arabic Language and Culture for Native Arabic Speakers I 3
COMM 102 Reading Image and Film 3
COMM 104 Photography and Communication 3
ENGL 102 Public Speaking 3
ENGL 201 Literature across Cultures 3
HIST 100 Contemporary Middle Eastern History 3
HIST 101 Ancient History of the Arabian Peninsula  3
PHIL 101 Ethics in Today’s World 3
PHIL 102 World Philosophies  3

Social and Behavioral Sciences Elective (3 Credits)

COMM 101 Interpersonal Communication and Group Interaction 3
PSYC 100 Introduction to Psychology 3
SOCI 101 Contemporary Social Issues 3
ECON 103 Principles of Microeconomics  3
SOCI 201 Topics in Global Perspectives 3
POLI 100 Critical Thinking and Reasoning  3
POLI 101 Politics of Scarcity  3
POLI 102 State and Society in the UAE  3
GEOG 100 World Regional Geography  3
GEOG 101 Introduction to Urban Social Geography 3

The Natural Sciences Elective (3-4 Credits)

BIOL 100 Humankind in a Biological World 3
CHEM 100/101 Chemistry in Everyday Life 4
CHEM 211 General Chemistry I  3
ENVS 100, 101 Energy and Environmental Science 4
ENVS 102 Sustainability and Human-Environment Relations 3

II. Communication Program Core Course Requirements (32 Credits)

COMM 110 Introduction to Communication  3
COMM 111 Introduction to Mass Communication 3
COMM 112 Introduction to Public Relations 3
COMM 113 Introduction to Digital Media 3
COMM 212 Media Writing 3
COMM 222 Intercultural Mass Communication 3
COMM 223 Globalization and Media Cultures 3
COMM 311 Media Law and Ethics 3
COMM 321 Theories of Media Communication  3
COMM 491 Communication Research Methodology 2
COMM 492 Mass Media and Public Opinion 3

III. Concentration Course Requirements (18 + 3 Credits)

A. Concentration in Digital Media

Core Courses (18 Credits)

COMM 214 New Media and Digital Culture 3
COMM 323 Advanced Journalism 3
COMM 329 Survey of Tools and Technology in Communication 3
COMM 334 Communication Transformation 3
COMM 423 Digital Practicum  3
COMM 424 Capstone: Multimedia Storytelling 3

Internship (3 Credits)

UNIV 390 Internship 3

Digital Media Concentration Electives (12 Credits)

COMM 221 Communication Analysis and Criticism 3
COMM 322 Digital Resources and Content 3
COMM 421 Social Media: Audiences and Messages 3
COMM 422 Streaming 3

B. Concentration in Public Relations (18 + 3 Credits)

Core Courses (18 Credits)

COMM 213 Public Relations Writing 3
COMM 334 Communication Transformation 3
COMM 337 Public Relations Cases  3
COMM 343 Public Relations Research Methods 3
COMM 421 Social Media: Audiences and Messages 3
COMM 427 Capstone: Media Production in Public Relations 3

Internship (3 Credits)

UNIV 390 Internship 3

Public Relations Concentration Electives (12 Credits)

COMM 221 Communication Analysis and Criticism 3
COMM 322 Digital Resources and Content 3
COMM 323 Advanced Journalism 3
COMM 329 Survey of Tools and Technology in Communication 3
COMM 422 Streaming 3

IV. Modern Language Competency Requirement (15 Credits)

French

FREN 101 Beginner Level French Language and Culture I 3
FREN 102 Beginner Level French Language and Culture II 3
FREN 201 Intermediate French I 3
FREN 202 Intermediate French II 3
FREN 220 Special Topics in French Culture and Civilization 3

Arabic for Non-Native Arabic Learners

ARAB 101 Beginner Level Arabic and Culture for non-Native Learners I 3
ARAB 102 Beginner Level Arabic – II 3
ARAB 201 Intermediate Arabic I 3
ARAB 202 Intermediate Arabic II 3
  Special Topics in Arab Culture and Civilization (course to be designed) 3

Arabic for Native Arabic Learners 

ARAB 311 Upper Intermediate Level Arabic Language and Culture for Native Arabic Speakers I 3
ARAB 312 Upper Intermediate Level Arabic Language and Culture for Native Arabic Speakers II 3
ARAB 411 Advanced Level Arabic Language and Culture for Native Arabic Speakers I 3
ARAB 412 Advanced Level Arabic Language and Culture for Native Arabic Speakers II 3
ARAB 420 Special Topics in Arab Culture and Civilization for Native Arabic Speakers 3
Total   120 Credits

Program Requirements

The B.A. in Mass Communication degree requires the completion of 120 credits in the following areas of study:

Degree Requirements Credits
I. University General Education Requirements 31
II. Department/Program Core Course Requirements 32
(Digital Media or Public Relations) Compulsory Courses 18
III. Modern Language and Culture Competency Requirement 15
IV. Concentration Electives 12
V. Free Electives 9
VI. Internship 3
Total 120

University General Education Requirements (31 Credits)

The General Education Program requires undergraduate students to take 31-34 credits in the following four categories:

  • Orientation courses (O): (13-14 credits)
  • Humanities/Fine Arts (H): (minimum of 6 credits)
  • Social and Behavioral Sciences (S): (minimum of 6 credits)
  • Natural Sciences/Mathematics (N): (minimum of 6 credits)

Orientation Courses (13-14 Credit Hours)
UNIV 100 University First-Year Transition is mandatory in the first semester.

Code Course Title Credits
ARAB 110 Arabic Language and Culture for Native Arabic Speakers I 3
ARAB 101 Beginner Level Arabic and Culture for non-Native Learners I 3
ENGL 101 Composition  (Writing Intensive Course) 3
ITEC 103 or
CSCI 112/113
Fundamentals of Information Technology  or
Introduction to Computer Programming
4-3
UNIV 100 University Freshman Transition 1
UNIV 200 Innovation, Entrepreneurship and Sustainability 3

Knowledge Domains (18-20 Credit Hours)

The knowledge domains are divided into the following three categories: Humanities and Fine Arts, Social and Behavioral Sciences, and the Natural Sciences.

Humanities and Fine Arts (6 credits required)

PHIL 100 Critical Thinking and Reasoning   (Writing Intensive Course) or 3
ENGL 200 Advanced Composition (Writing Intensive Course)  3
MEST 100 Introduction to Islam in World Culture   (Writing Intensive Course) 3

Social and Behavioral Sciences (6 credits required)

UAES 200 Survey of United Arab Emirates Studies (Writing Intensive Course) 3
COMM 101 Interpersonal Communication and Group Interaction 3
ECON 103 Principles of Microeconomics  3
POLI 100 Contemporary Global Issues 3
POLI 101 Politics of Scarcity  3
PSYC 100 Introduction to Psychology 3

Natural Sciences (6-8 credits required)

MATH 101 Numbers and Data Interpretation 4-3
MATH 108 Calculus with Business Applications 
MATH 111 Calculus with Life Sciences Applications
MATH 113 Calculus I
STAT 100 Introductory Probability and Statistics
BIOL 100 Humankind in a Biological World 4-3
CHEM 100/101 Chemistry in Everyday Life
CHEM 211/212 General Chemistry I 
ENVS 102 Sustainability and Human-Environment Relations

The fifth writing intensive course for the BA in Mass Communication is COMM 450 Selected Topics in Communication.

Communication Program Core Course Requirements (32 Credits)

COMM 111 Introduction to Mass Communication 3
COMM 112 Introduction to Public Relations 3
COMM 113 Introduction to Digital Media 3
COMM 212 Media Writing 3
COMM 215 Feature Writing 3
COMM 222 Intercultural Mass Communication 3
COMM 223 Globalization and Media Cultures 3
COMM 311 Media Law and Ethics 3
COMM 321 Theories of Media Communication  3
COMM 391 Communication Research Methodology 2
COMM 492 Mass Media and Public Opinion 3

Concentration Course Requirements 18+3 Credit

Concentration inDigital Media

CoreCourses: 18 Credit Hours

COMM 214 New Media and Digital Culture 3
COMM 224 Visual Storytelling 3
COMM 323 Advanced Journalism 3
COMM 334 Communication Transformation 3
COMM 423 Digital Practicum  3
COMM 424 Capstone: Multimedia Storytelling 3

Internship (3 Credits)

UNIV 390 Internship 3

PublicRelations Concentration Electives: 12 Credit Hours

COMM 214 New Media and Digital Culture 3
COMM 221 Communication Analysis and Criticism 3
COMM 224 Visual Storytelling 3
COMM 322 Digital Resources and Content 3
COMM 450 Selected Topics in Communication 3

Modern Language Competency Requirement 15 Credits

French

FREN 101 Beginner Level French Language and Culture I 3
FREN 102 Beginner Level French Language and Culture II 3
FREN 201 Intermediate French I 3
FREN 202 Intermediate French II 3
FREN 220 Special Topics in French Culture and Civilization 3

Arabic for Non-Native Arabic Learners

ARAB 101 Beginner Level Arabic and Culture for non-Native Learners I 3
ARAB 102 Beginner Level Arabic – II 3
ARAB 201 Intermediate Arabic I 3
ARAB 202 Intermediate Arabic II 3
Special Topics in Arab Culture and Civilization (course to be designed) 3

Arabic for Native Arabic Learners 

ARAB 311 Upper Intermediate Level Arabic Language and Culture for Native Arabic Speakers I 3
ARAB 312 Upper Intermediate Level Arabic Language and Culture for Native Arabic Speakers II 3
ARAB 411 Advanced Level Arabic Language and Culture for Native Arabic Speakers I 3
ARAB 412 Advanced Level Arabic Language and Culture for Native Arabic Speakers II 3
ARAB 420 Special Topics in Arab Culture and Civilization for Native Arabic Speakers 3
Total 120 Credits
Last updated: Nov 24, 2020 @ 11:09 am

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ENGL 101 - Composition

Pre-requisite(s): ENGL 099 or passing English Placement Test

English 101 provides students with intensive practice in drafting, revising, and editing expository essays for an academic audience. Using logical, rhetorical, and linguistic structures in their writing, students also develop their ability to think creatively, critically, and independently. Throughout the course, students engage in reading texts, evaluating sources, using their reading to form their own opinions, preparing research papers, and employing the MLA documentation style to avoid plagiarism.

ENGL 200 (ENGL 302) Advanced Composition

Pre-requisite(s): Completion of a minimum of 36 credit hours and credit for ENGL 101 (Completion of 45 credits)

This course builds on the general college-level writing skills and strategies students have acquired in earlier courses, and prepares them to do advanced level analysis and writing specifically within their major field and their possible future workplaces.

PHIL 100 - Critical Thinking and Reasoning 

This introduction to basic principles of reasoning and critical thinking enhances the learner’s abilities to evaluate various forms of reasoning in everyday life and in academic disciplines. The course explores such topics as inductive and deductive reasoning, the nature and function of definitions, fallacy types, statistic use and misuse, and the rudiments of logic.

ITEC 103 - (SCIT 103) Fundamentals of Information Technology 

The course focuses on the nature and uses of computers with an introduction to word processing, spreadsheets, databases and presentation software and related lab projects and includes computer systems organizations, communications and networking, legal and ethical issues, effective presentation information, computer security and the internet.

MATH 101 - Numbers and Data Interpretation

This course will be designed to improve students’ quantitative awareness using familiar situations so to as provide a sense of purpose for studying mathematics. Similarly, the course develops students’ understanding of the techniques involved in the construction of mathematical models, using problemsolving strategies from mathematics and statistics. The topics of the course include: sets and logic; linear, quadratic, logarithmic and exponential models of growth; Financial mathematics; interest theory, loans, annuities; and probability and descriptive statistics and estimation.

MEST 100 - Introduction to Islam in World Culture 

The course provides an introduction to the basic sources and historical contexts for the origins of Islam; some of the basic spiritual principles expressed in those sources; the contexts and practices that exemplify the spiritual principles; contributions Islam has made to civilization and to the political, social and cultural identity of the UAE. It will illustrate the concept of Islamic studies through a global, interdisciplinary and comparative approach and examine contemporary global and local issues that impact and are impacted by Islamic culture.

UNIV 100 - University Freshman Transition

Students in this course transition to university life by focusing on academic adjustment, by developing decision-making skills, and by learning about services and opportunities for involvement. Although all classes have a core body of knowledge, each class specializes in a particular aspect of university life.

UNIV 200 - Innovation, Entrepreneurship and Sustainability (3 Credits)

This course aims at equipping the next generation of leaders in the UAE with an innovative and entrepreneurial mindset and its related core skills. The course combines three main points: design thinking, entrepreneurship, and growth and leadership.

ARTT 100 - Introduction to Visual Arts

Pre-requisite(s): ENGL 101 (ENGL 100/101)

The course provides an introduction to the art and architecture of various geographical regions around the world in order to provide the ability for appreciation, interpretation and historical understanding. It focuses on a select number of major developments in a range of media and cultures, emphasizing the way that works of art function both as aesthetic and material objects and as cultural artifacts and forces.

ARAB 110 - Arabic Language and Culture for Native Arabic Speakers I

Pre-requisite(s): ENGL 101

Arabic literature has developed many traditions though originating from a common source. The course is an introduction to representative texts from contemporary Arab writers, and their connections with the traditions of the past. The method is comparative, with a study of literary, political social and religious aspects, as well as the application of a theoretical framework of analysis.

COMM 102 - Reading Image and Film

Pre-requisite(s): ENGL 101

This course allows leaners to study aesthetic effects and strategies of persuasion in contemporary visual images. Learning engagement include images in electronic media, film, photographs, cartoons, advertisements, and public performances and events.

COMM 104 - Photography and Communication

Perceptions of the world are recorded visually in different ways. The course is an introduction to the techniques of digital photography and trains learners in the visual competence of reading, analyzing, composing and communicating effective visual messages.

ENGL 102 - Public Speaking

Pre-requisite(s): ENGL 101 (ENGL 100/101)

This course is designed to provide an overview of principles to develop effective presentations for public and professional settings while integrating appropriate technologies. Course content and assignments emphasize audience analysis, effective and coherent composition development, research strategies and skills, and presentation delivery methods to strengthen confidence and credibility.

ENGL 201 Literature across Cultures

Pre-requisite: ENGL 102

Students explore world literature as a form of cultural expression and develop their sensitivity to cultural diversity through a critical study of the literatures of the world, through a study selections from a variety of texts which may include short fiction, novels, graphic novels, plays, essays, poems and films, as a socio-cultural response by writers to the world in which they live. They will deepen their knowledge of the complexities of human life and nature, and develop respect for people and cultures, love for nature, desire for peace and commitment to justice and will also become familiar with those literary terms and conventions necessary to discuss and write about literary works.

HIST 100 - Contemporary Middle Eastern History

The course is designed to acquaint students with an in-depth understanding of the major issues affecting the Middle East in the 21st century, will review the origins and development of the modern Middle East and understand the social, economic, and political foundations that set the stage for the region this century. Students will also become familiar with original source material that frame the key issues in the modern Middle East and engage in discussion of key issues.

HIST 101 - Ancient History of the Arabian Peninsula 

This course concentrates on the geographical background of the Arabian Peninsula, including its location, and descriptions of its provinces, routes, its flora and fauna. It also focuses on the commercial importance and its political situation during the period from the third Millennium B.C. to the rise of Islam or to the seventh century A.D. There are some details about archaeological sites in the Peninsula. It also studies in details about the ancient kingdoms, civilizations, people and societies of Arabia. This course deals with religious, political, commercial and social situations in Arabia before the Rise of Islam. The course also studies the relations between the ancient Arabs and their neighbors.

PHIL 101 - Ethics in Today’s World

The course provides learners with an understanding of the theoretical foundations of ethical thought, and a background to the traditions and movements in the development of ethical theory and methods of reasoning. Contemporary ethical, moral, and social issues that are of global concern, such as justice, decisions about right and wrong, responses to technological changes, responsibility for the environment, human rights and responsibility for other human beings, and other major business, legal, and medical issues are among the topics exposed by learners. Students apply ethical principles and perspectives to analyze, compare and critically evaluate relevant personal, social and professional problems and engage in ethical reasoning and decision making processes.

PHIL 102 - World Philosophies 

The course surveys the major philosophers from the most important world philosophical traditions: European, Indian, Chinese, etc. Some of the topics addressed include the internal world of personal identity, the nature of knowledge, the concept of happiness, the nature of reality and the external world, the relation of language to the world, meaning, and truth.

COMM 101 - Interpersonal Communication and Group Interaction

Pre-requisite(s): ENGL 101

The course presents the principles to develop appropriate and effective communication strategies in one-to-one and small group communication settings. It emphasizes analyzing and assessing communication skills to create and sustain effective communication in personal and professional relationships.

PSYC 100 - Introduction to Psychology

This course provides an overview of major areas in the field of psychology. The following topics will be covered in this course: history of psychology; research methods used in psychology; organization of human brain and biological basis of behavior; sensation; perception; basic principles of learning; cognition; language; intelligence; emotion; motivation; developmental psychology; personality theories and assessment, stress and its effect on health; abnormal behavior and therapies; and, social psychology.

SOCI 101 - Contemporary Social Issues

The course is an introduction to basic sociological concepts and examines aspects of human behavior in a cultural framework including: individual and group interaction, social mobility and stratification, status and class, race and gender relations, urbanism, crime and criminology, and social change and reform.

ECON 103 - (GEEC 103) Principles of Microeconomics 

This course introduces learners to microeconomics in the context of current problems. It explores how market mechanism allocates scare resources among competing uses. It uses supply, demand, production, and distribution theory to analyze problems.

PHIL 100 - Critical Thinking and Reasoning 

This introduction to basic principles of reasoning and critical thinking enhances the learner’s abilities to evaluate various forms of reasoning in everyday life and in academic disciplines. The course explores such topics as inductive and deductive reasoning, the nature and function of definitions, fallacy types, statistic use and misuse, and the rudiments of logic.

POLI 101 - Politics of Scarcity 

The problems of scarcity and security are as much political as they are economic or technological. This course identifies the political aspects of global economic exchange and distribution, flows of labor and capital, and international cooperation, global security and conflict.

POLI 102 - State and Society in the UAE 

The course traces the history of the UAE, the establishment of the federation and the development of the UAE as a nation with significant global impact. It covers contemporary life, the economy, society, population, political system, social customs and traditions, and current changes.

GEOG 100 - (GEOG 200) World Regional Geography 

This course will examine a broad range of geographical perspectives covering all of the major regions of the world. Each region will be reviewed in a similar structure so students can clearly see the similarities and differences between each region. Specifically, the course will explore where each region is located along with its physical characteristics, including absolute and relative location, climate, and significant geographical features. The exploration will then continue on to look at each region from a cultural, economic, and political perspective, closely examining the human impact on each region from these perspectives as well as how human activities impact the environments of the region. The student will first review the basic theories of the discipline of geography, the relationship of world population and resources and the factors affecting development. Next, the student will survey the major regions of the world to identify each region's distinguishing geographic characteristics. This course is a descriptive synthesis of the world's realms and major regions. The basic geographic components of each region, both physical and human, are discussed as the course spans the globe in a single semester to give a broad comparative overview of world regional geography. For each of the world’s realms, a regional issue is identified and current issues will be incorporated into classes as they arise. The aim of this course is to introduce students to the geographic regions of the world while emphasizing the nature of their physical resources, economies, culture and politics. These courses will also address the issue of why certain countries are developed versus under-developed.

GEOG 101 -  Introduction to Urban Social Geography (3 Credits)

This course provides an overview of urban social geography. The student will learn about the history of cities, how they effect the lives of urban dwellers, and the importance of cities in a globalized world. Environmental concerns will also be addressed.

BIOL 100 - Humankind in a Biological World

Human beings interact with, affect and are affected by other living organisms. This course explores the ways in which human activities have had an impact on other life on earth, mankind and disease and the development of scientific thought.

CHEM 100 - Chemistry in Everyday Life

Co-requisite: CHEM 101

The main focus of this course is on how chemistry is involved our everyday life. It covers the basic chemical principles that impact us with their immediate applications. It addresses the effect of chemicals in everyday life and introduces the techniques that make our lives easier.

CHEM 211 - General Chemistry I 

This course covers the foundations of chemical concepts: basic facts and principles of chemistry, including atoms, molecules, ions, chemical reactions, gas theory, thermochemistry, electrochemistry, chemical kinetics and equilibrium, molecular geometry, and states of matter.

ENVS 100,101 - Energy and Environmental Science

Co-requisite: ENVS 101

The course is an inter-disciplinary study of environmental disruption and management, natural environmental systems, and the human impact on them. Other topics include energy procurement and use, waste management, water resources and water pollution, acid rain, global warming and ozone depletion.

ENVS 102 - Sustainability and Human-Environment Relations

The course examines the interactions between human and environmental systems, and its effect on the future of environmental sustainability. Topics covered include global and local environmental change, conservation of the ecosystem, biodiversity, water management and climate change.

COMM 110 - Introduction to Communication 

This course introduces students to general field of communication with engagement in formal approaches and techniques for a better understanding of the history and contemporary issues in the field.

COMM 111 - Introduction to Mass Communication

Pre-requisite(s): COMM 110

This course surveys the history and characteristics of mass communication as a field and set of intertwining industries and professions. Learners explore the role of mass media in modern society by considering the impact of technology, culture, government, and economics. Trends are considered in historical context.

COMM 112 - Introduction to Public Relations

Pre-requisite(s): COMM 110

This course provides learners with basic knowledge about the theories, concepts, and best practices in communication within the public relations field.

COMM 113 - Introduction to Digital Media

Pre-requisite(s): ENGL 101 and ITEC 103

Introduction to Digital Media, three credit hours course allows students to learn and understand the basics of Digital Media. The course content discusses various technologies that will aid students to learn the language of visual imagery. The applications that will be focused on industry standard applications for many graphic design positions. In this course, students will build a blog as a means of communicating and presenting their work as producing print and digital layouts to a wide audience.

COMM 212 - Media Writing

Pre-requisite(s): ENGL 101

This course introduces learners to the basic norms, values, standards and practices for writing for the mass media.

COMM 222 - Intercultural Mass Communication

Pre-requisite(s): COMM 110

This course explores the communication strategies and techniques within a specific cultural milieu and how those strategies and techniques differ among various cultural milieu, and learners practice in a variety of communication modes how best to accommodate their rhetorical strategies in communicating to both intracultural and intercultural audiences.

COMM 223 - Globalization and Media Cultures

Pre-requisite(s): COMM 110

Learners in this course apply communication strategies to and investigate real-world case study challenges with a global worldview of various issues of global media cultures. Students learn how to develop a Weltanschauung from which to best communicate in modern technologies with world audience.

COMM 311 - Media Law and Ethics
3 Semester Credit Hours
Prerequisite(s): COMM 111

Learners engage the philosophical underpinnings of ethics and the core principles of journalism and mass communication to develop an understanding and appreciation of the field’s normative ethical values. Students will learn how to apply an ethical decision-making framework to a variety of challenges.

COMM 321 - Theories of Media Communication 

Pre-requisite(s): COMM 111

Learners identify the major concepts, issues, and theories of media communication, and learners identify and use communication theories in a variety of best practices to demonstrate effective use of the theories learned in the course.

COMM 491 - Communication Research Methodology

Co-requisite: COMM 492

This course provides an introduction to research methods and the philosophical underpinnings of research inquiry in the field of communication. It includes the topic adherence, overviews of quantitative, qualitative, and mixed-method research methodologies, a range of alternative research methods, including observation, archival research, questionnaire surveys, case studies, and experimentation, research design, data collection, and data analysis, the ethical implications of research with human and non-human subjects, and appropriate connections between research questions and methodologies.

COMM 492 - Mass Media and Public Opinion
3 Semester Credit Hours
Corequisite(s): COMM 321 and COMM 391

This course is designed to prepare students to be informed and critical consumers of polls and media coverage of them, to introduce students to basic theories and findings regarding the influence of mass media on public opinion, to provide students with firsthand experience in conducting and writing about public opinion research.

COMM 214 - New Media and Digital Culture

Pre-requisite(s): COMM 111 and COMM 113

This course examines the cultural impact of new digital technologies, such as the Internet and new telephone and audiovisual media. Students survey the origins of digital communication and the Internet; and they are introduced to contemporary scholarship on digital technologies, the Internet, and the institutions that control these technologies.

COMM 323 - Advanced Journalism

Pre-requisite(s): COMM 111, COMM 213, and COMM 311

This course will engage learners in the values, norms and professional practices newsgathering and writing. Emphasis is on traditional reporting methods, including interviewing and observation, and on the ethical, reliable presentation of news in print/digital formats.

COMM 329 - Survey of Tools and Technology in Communication

Pre-requisite(s): ITEC 103L; COMM 321 OR COMM 323

This course provides learners with an overview of the development and history of media technologies with a focus on their influence on form, content, and the practices of news media professionals and consumers.

COMM 334 - Communication Transformation

Pre-requisite(s): COMM 323

This course introduces multimedia production skills to students. Learners integrate text, audio, photos and video to produce online media packages that are attractive, accessible, easy to navigate, and appropriate for the platform and the audience.

COMM 423 - Digital Practicum 

Pre-requisite(s): COMM 323

This course allows students to explore magazine-style writing, editing, and presentation in the digital environment. Students collectively produce an online, magazine-style, publication.

COMM 424 - Capstone: Multimedia Storytelling

Pre-requisite(s): COMM 423; Co-requisite: COMM 322

In this course, learners apply skills in newsgathering, writing, and multimedia to produce an individual and a group project of publication quality that demonstrates their proficiency in multimedia storytelling.

UNIV 390 - Internship (3 credits, 180 - 240 hours of work experience)

Pre-requisite(s): Completion of 90 credits and CGPA greater than 2.0

Approved, monitored work experience providing the opportunity to apply concepts and theories learned in the classroom to actual practice in the workplace, in order to develop skills and to gain experience and knowledge for future employment. Students must apply for an internship a semester before the summer of the internship and comply with all requirements outlined in the Internship Manual.

COMM 221 - Communication Analysis and Criticism

This course investigates media through a variety of theories and methods. The focus will be on some of the dominant critical perspectives that have contributed to our understanding of media and its role in society. The course provides the basic vocabulary and concepts used to analyze different types of media. The aim of this course is to explore, understand, and effectively apply various schools of media criticism through reading, watching, discussing, and writing a wide range of media texts.

COMM 322 - Digital Resources and Content

Co-requisite: COMM 212

This course allows learners to explore the Internet for data; to assess data found online; to produce “value-added” research from online databases; and, to understand the principles behind turning original data into a useable online resource

COMM 421 - Social Media: Audiences and Messages

Pre-requisite(s): COMM 110 AND COMM 111 OR COMM 112

Learners explore social media as a unique platform for interaction with multiple audiences and learn how to plan strategies to engage with key stakeholders and disseminate persuasive, effective messages.

COMM 422 - Streaming

Pre-requisite(s): COMM 322

The course covers basic desktop digital video and audio applications, video streaming, and basic design for web and mobile products with a focus on aesthetics, functionality, and access.

COMM 213 - Public Relations Writing

Pre-requisite(s): COMM 212

Learners improve their media-related writing skills with a focus on standard, professional presentation of information and messages in the public relations setting.

COMM 334 - Communication Transformation

Pre-requisite(s): COMM 323

This course introduces multimedia production skills to students. Learners integrate text, audio, photos and video to produce online media packages that are attractive, accessible, easy to navigate, and appropriate for the platform and the audience.

COMM 337 - Public Relations Cases 

Pre-requisite(s): COMM 112 and COMM 343

This course gives learners the context, knowledge, and skills to examine and critically analyze realworld public relations problems and cases. Students will study and apply communication and public relations theories to case studies and problems. Learners examine the four steps included in the design of public relations programs that include research, planning, implementation, and evaluation.

COMM 343 - Public Relations Research Methods

Pre-requisite(s): COMM 112

This course provides learners with the tools to outline, execute and evaluate mass media research. The primary focus is on using research for public relations programs and campaigns—planning, monitoring and evaluating. The course focuses on research methods used in the field, including content analysis, focus groups, in-depth interviews, surveys, and experiments.

COMM 421 - Social Media: Audiences and Messages

Pre-requisite(s): COMM 110 AND COMM 111 OR COMM 112

Learners explore social media as a unique platform for interaction with multiple audiences and learn how to plan strategies to engage with key stakeholders and disseminate persuasive, effective messages.

COMM 427 - Capstone: Media Production in Public Relations

Pre-requisite(s): COMM 213 Co-requisite: COMM 343

The course provides learners with practical instruction and experience in a variety of media modes of communication. Students focus on producing clear, persuasive messages in attractive formats.

UNIV 390 - Internship (3 credits, 180 - 240 hours of work experience)

Pre-requisite(s): Completion of 90 credits and CGPA greater than 2.0

Approved, monitored work experience providing the opportunity to apply concepts and theories learned in the classroom to actual practice in the workplace, in order to develop skills and to gain experience and knowledge for future employment. Students must apply for an internship a semester before the summer of the internship and comply with all requirements outlined in the Internship Manual.

COMM 221 - Communication Analysis and Criticism

This course investigates media through a variety of theories and methods. The focus will be on some of the dominant critical perspectives that have contributed to our understanding of media and its role in society. The course provides the basic vocabulary and concepts used to analyze different types of media. The aim of this course is to explore, understand, and effectively apply various schools of media criticism through reading, watching, discussing, and writing a wide range of media texts.

COMM 322 - Digital Resources and Content

Co-requisite: COMM 212

This course allows learners to explore the Internet for data; to assess data found online; to produce “value-added” research from online databases; and, to understand the principles behind turning original data into a useable online resource

COMM 323 - Advanced Journalism

Pre-requisite(s): COMM 111, COMM 213, and COMM 311

This course will engage learners in the values, norms and professional practices newsgathering and writing. Emphasis is on traditional reporting methods, including interviewing and observation, and on the ethical, reliable presentation of news in print/digital formats.

COMM 329 - Survey of Tools and Technology in Communication

Pre-requisite(s): ITEC 103L; COMM 321 OR COMM 323

This course provides learners with an overview of the development and history of media technologies with a focus on their influence on form, content, and the practices of news media professionals and consumers.

COMM 422 - Streaming

Pre-requisite(s): COMM 322

The course covers basic desktop digital video and audio applications, video streaming, and basic design for web and mobile products with a focus on aesthetics, functionality, and access.

FREN 101 - Beginner Level French Language and Culture I

Pre-requisites: None

FREN 101 is the first course in a four-course beginner and intermediate French language sequence. The course has been designed for students who have no prior knowledge of the French Language and will be conducted in French as much as possible in order to foster skills in listening, speaking, reading, writing, and promote cultural awareness.

FREN 102 - Beginner Level French Language and Culture II

Pre-requisites: FREN 101

FREN 102 is the second course in a four-course beginner and intermediate French language sequence. The course has been designed for students who have completed FREN 101; it aims to foster skills in listening, speaking, reading, and writing, as well as to promote cultural awareness. The course will be conducted in French as much as possible.

FREN 201 - Intermediate French I

Pre-requisite(s): FREN 102

This is the third course in a four-course beginner and intermediate French language sequence. The course is a continuation of FREN 102. Not unlike 101 and 102, the course continues to foster skills in listening, speaking, reading, and writing, as well as to promote cultural awareness. Particular attention is paid to vocabulary development and applied grammar.

FREN 202 - Intermediate French II

Pre-requisite(s): FREN 201

This is the fourth course in a four-course beginner and intermediate French language sequence. The course is a continuation of FREN 102. The course aims to foster skills in listening, speaking, reading, and writing, as well as to promote cultural awareness. Students will read a variety of texts and should be able to express themselves with some fluency on a variety of topics by the end of the course.

FREN 220 - Special Topics in French Culture and Civilization

Pre-requisite(s): FREN 202

Complementing the four course beginner and intermediate sequence in French Language and Culture, FREN 220 critically examines specific topics relating to French culture and intellectual history. Topics of focus may include, but are not limited to, French and the Media, French in the MENA region, and francophone literature and film. FREN 220 is the capstone course in the beginner and intermediate language sequence in French. The course is taught as much as possible in French.

ARAB 101 Beginner Level Arabic and Culture for non-Native Learners I

Pre-requisite: None

Beginner Level Arabic Language and Culture 1 is the first in a four-course beginner and intermediate Arabic language sequence specifically tailored to the needs of non-native Arabic language students in the English and Mass Communication Programs (though any non-native learner of Arabic may enroll). This course introduces the student to the Arabic alphabet and the basics of reading and writing in Modern Standard Arabic (MSA). Instruction in the language is enriched by reference to cultural themes and visits to sites of cultural importance.

ARAB 102 - Beginner Level Arabic – II

Pre-requisite(s): ARAB 101

Beginner Level Arabic II is a direct continuation of Beginner Level Arabic I. This course is designed to enhance the reading, speaking and listening skills. With this course, students can increase their vocabulary and improve their grammar in Arabic.

ARAB 201 - Intermediate Arabic I

Pre-requisite(s): ARAB 102

The course provides an introduction to academic sources of the language. This program is specially designed to teach Arabic to university level Arabic students.

ARAB 202 - Intermediate Arabic II

Pre-requisite(s): ARAB 201

Students engage in simple Arabic conversation on a range of everyday subjects so students properly introduce themselves, and engage in simple conversation on a range of everyday topics. Building upon the basic foundation provided in Level 1, topics include the definite article. Proper pronunciation and listening skills continue to be emphasized. In addition, readings and exposure to Arabic culture, students demonstrate further competence with structure and the pattern of words and sentences.

ARAB 311 - Upper Intermediate Level Arabic Language and Culture for Native Arabic Speakers I

Pre-requisite: Arabic Placement Test

Upper Intermediate Level Arabic Language and Culture I is the first course in a four course sequence for the native Arabic speaker. All courses in the sequence are taught in Modern Standard Arabic (MSA). The course is designed to provide native Arabic-speakers with higher level linguistic skills in writing, reading, speaking, and listening. Emphasis is placed on grammar review, vocabulary acquisition, and composition. This course (and the subsequent sequence of courses) is tailored particularly to students interested in Arabic-English translation in the English Language and Mass Communication Programs.

ARAB 312 - Upper Intermediate Level Arabic Language and Culture for Native Arabic Speakers II

Pre-requisite: ARAB 311

Upper Intermediate Level Arabic Language and Culture II is a direct continuation of ARAB 311. It is designed to provide Arabic-speaking Translation and Mass Communications majors with the linguistic skills (writing, reading, speaking, listening) that serve as a solid foundation to the journalistic expression in Arabic. Emphasis is placed on grammar review, vocabulary acquisition, and composition.

ARAB 411 - Advanced Level Arabic Language and Culture for Native Arabic Speakers I

Pre-requisite(s): ARAB 312

This is a direct continuation of Arabic 312. The course substantially expands students’ existing vocabulary and capability of expression, both orally and in writing. Literary texts of increasing sophistication are used in the course.

ARAB 412 - Advanced Level Arabic Language and Culture for Native Arabic Speakers II

Pre-requisite: ARAB 411

Advanced Level Arabic Language and Culture for Native Arabic Speakers II is a direct continuation of ARAB 411 and represents the fourth course in the Arabic Language and Culture for native speakers’ sequence. This course provides a survey of themes and genres of Arabic literature from the mid- 19th century to the present. While focus will be on content, students will continue their acquisition of MSA through written and oral assignments designed for their advanced level of competency.

ARAB 420 - Special Topics in Arab Culture and Civilization for Native Arabic Speakers

Pre-requisite: ARAB 412

Supplementing the four course sequence in Arabic Language and Culture for native speakers, ARAB 420 will be taught in MSA. The course critically examines issues, values, and institutions of the contemporary Arab world primarily through analysis and discussion of current events. While focus will be on content, students will continue their acquisition of Modern Standard Arabic through written and oral assignments designed for their level of competency.

ARAB 110 - Arabic Language and Culture for Native Arabic Speakers I

Pre-requisite(s): ENGL 101

Arabic literature has developed many traditions though originating from a common source. The course is an introduction to representative texts from contemporary Arab writers, and their connections with the traditions of the past. The method is comparative, with a study of literary, political social and religious aspects, as well as the application of a theoretical framework of analysis.

ARAB 101 Beginner Level Arabic and Culture for non-Native Learners I

Pre-requisite: None

Beginner Level Arabic Language and Culture 1 is the first in a four-course beginner and intermediate Arabic language sequence specifically tailored to the needs of non-native Arabic language students in the English and Mass Communication Programs (though any non-native learner of Arabic may enroll). This course introduces the student to the Arabic alphabet and the basics of reading and writing in Modern Standard Arabic (MSA). Instruction in the language is enriched by reference to cultural themes and visits to sites of cultural importance.

ENGL 101 - Composition

Pre-requisite(s): ENGL 099 or passing English Placement Test

English 101 provides students with intensive practice in drafting, revising, and editing expository essays for an academic audience. Using logical, rhetorical, and linguistic structures in their writing, students also develop their ability to think creatively, critically, and independently. Throughout the course, students engage in reading texts, evaluating sources, using their reading to form their own opinions, preparing research papers, and employing the MLA documentation style to avoid plagiarism.

ITEC 103 - (SCIT 103) Fundamentals of Information Technology 

The course focuses on the nature and uses of computers with an introduction to word processing, spreadsheets, databases and presentation software and related lab projects and includes computer systems organizations, communications and networking, legal and ethical issues, effective presentation information, computer security and the internet.

CSCI 112 - Introduction to Computer Programming

Co-requisite: CSCI 113

This course introduces students to computers and programming languages. In addition, students learn to use computer programming as a problem-solving tool. Topics in procedural programming include expressions, control structures, simple data types, input/output, testing, debugging, and programming environments.

UNIV 100 - University Freshman Transition

Students in this course transition to university life by focusing on academic adjustment, by developing decision-making skills, and by learning about services and opportunities for involvement. Although all classes have a core body of knowledge, each class specializes in a particular aspect of university life.

UNIV 200 - Innovation, Entrepreneurship and Sustainability (3 Credits)

This course aims at equipping the next generation of leaders in the UAE with an innovative and entrepreneurial mindset and its related core skills. The course combines three main points: design thinking, entrepreneurship, and growth and leadership.

PHIL 100 - Critical Thinking and Reasoning 

This introduction to basic principles of reasoning and critical thinking enhances the learner’s abilities to evaluate various forms of reasoning in everyday life and in academic disciplines. The course explores such topics as inductive and deductive reasoning, the nature and function of definitions, fallacy types, statistic use and misuse, and the rudiments of logic.

ENGL 200 (ENGL 302) Advanced Composition

Pre-requisite(s): Completion of a minimum of 36 credit hours and credit for ENGL 101 (Completion of 45 credits)

This course builds on the general college-level writing skills and strategies students have acquired in earlier courses, and prepares them to do advanced level analysis and writing specifically within their major field and their possible future workplaces.

MEST 100 - Introduction to Islam in World Culture 

The course provides an introduction to the basic sources and historical contexts for the origins of Islam; some of the basic spiritual principles expressed in those sources; the contexts and practices that exemplify the spiritual principles; contributions Islam has made to civilization and to the political, social and cultural identity of the UAE. It will illustrate the concept of Islamic studies through a global, interdisciplinary and comparative approach and examine contemporary global and local issues that impact and are impacted by Islamic culture.

UAES 200 - Survey of United Arab Emirates Studies
1 Semester Credit Hour

This course presents the UAE from multiple perspectives in an attempt to expose the students to the distinct qualities of the UAE. The purpose of this course is to give students a broad, interdisciplinary, and comprehensive introduction to key features and issues in the UAE’s historical, cultural, political and economic landscapes. (Writing Intensive Course)

COMM 101 - Interpersonal Communication and Group Interaction

Pre-requisite(s): ENGL 101

The course presents the principles to develop appropriate and effective communication strategies in one-to-one and small group communication settings. It emphasizes analyzing and assessing communication skills to create and sustain effective communication in personal and professional relationships.

ECON 103 - (GEEC 103) Principles of Microeconomics 

This course introduces learners to microeconomics in the context of current problems. It explores how market mechanism allocates scare resources among competing uses. It uses supply, demand, production, and distribution theory to analyze problems.

POLI 100 - Contemporary Global Issues

The course addresses contemporary issues impacting international and global affairs, and the major political, social, economic and environmental forces confronting global communities. Some of the themes are democracy and human rights, nationalism and conditions of conflict and stability, economic globalization, resource distribution and depletion, responsibilities of international and transnational organizations, technological development and environmental concerns, cultural diversity and identity, and the possibility of global stability and future world order.

POLI 101 - Politics of Scarcity 

The problems of scarcity and security are as much political as they are economic or technological. This course identifies the political aspects of global economic exchange and distribution, flows of labor and capital, and international cooperation, global security and conflict.

PSYC 100 - Introduction to Psychology

This course provides an overview of major areas in the field of psychology. The following topics will be covered in this course: history of psychology; research methods used in psychology; organization of human brain and biological basis of behavior; sensation; perception; basic principles of learning; cognition; language; intelligence; emotion; motivation; developmental psychology; personality theories and assessment, stress and its effect on health; abnormal behavior and therapies; and, social psychology.

MATH 101 - Numbers and Data Interpretation

This course will be designed to improve students’ quantitative awareness using familiar situations so to as provide a sense of purpose for studying mathematics. Similarly, the course develops students’ understanding of the techniques involved in the construction of mathematical models, using problemsolving strategies from mathematics and statistics. The topics of the course include: sets and logic; linear, quadratic, logarithmic and exponential models of growth; Financial mathematics; interest theory, loans, annuities; and probability and descriptive statistics and estimation.

MATH 108 - Calculus with Business Applications 

Pre-requisite(s): MATH 093/103, or appropriate score on Math Placement test

The course covers standard topics such as functions, limits, derivative, and integral calculus as well as applications of differentiation and integration. Simple introductory examples and applications are drawn from, but do not require advanced knowledge of business applications.

MATH 111 - Calculus with Life Sciences Applications

Pre-requisite(s): MATH 095/105 or appropriate score on Math Placement test

The course covers standard topics such as functions, limits, derivative, and integral calculus as well as applications of differentiation and integration. Simple introductory examples and applications are drawn from, but do not require advanced knowledge of the life sciences.

MATH 113 - Calculus I

Pre-requisite(s): MATH 095/105, or appropriate score on Math Placement test

The concept of derivative (instantaneous rate of change) is an essential factor in solving real-world problems. One of the objectives of this course is to understand the conceptual foundation of derivative, and learn different techniques of computing the derivative, as well as learning how to apply it to solve real-world problems. Another objective is to understand the concept of integration and learn basic integration technique.

STAT 100 - Introductory Probability and Statistics
3 Semester Credit Hours

This course introduces students to the basics of probability theory and statistical inference with examples and applications in sciences. At the end of this course, students will acquire the necessary quantitative competency in the program.

BIOL 100 - Humankind in a Biological World

Human beings interact with, affect and are affected by other living organisms. This course explores the ways in which human activities have had an impact on other life on earth, mankind and disease and the development of scientific thought.

CHEM 100 - Chemistry in Everyday Life

Co-requisite: CHEM 101

The main focus of this course is on how chemistry is involved our everyday life. It covers the basic chemical principles that impact us with their immediate applications. It addresses the effect of chemicals in everyday life and introduces the techniques that make our lives easier.

CHEM 211 - General Chemistry I 

This course covers the foundations of chemical concepts: basic facts and principles of chemistry, including atoms, molecules, ions, chemical reactions, gas theory, thermochemistry, electrochemistry, chemical kinetics and equilibrium, molecular geometry, and states of matter.

ENVS 102 - Sustainability and Human-Environment Relations

The course examines the interactions between human and environmental systems, and its effect on the future of environmental sustainability. Topics covered include global and local environmental change, conservation of the ecosystem, biodiversity, water management and climate change.

COMM 111 - Introduction to Mass Communication

Pre-requisite(s): COMM 110

This course surveys the history and characteristics of mass communication as a field and set of intertwining industries and professions. Learners explore the role of mass media in modern society by considering the impact of technology, culture, government, and economics. Trends are considered in historical context.

COMM 112 - Introduction to Public Relations

Pre-requisite(s): COMM 110

This course provides learners with basic knowledge about the theories, concepts, and best practices in communication within the public relations field.

COMM 113 - Introduction to Digital Media

Pre-requisite(s): ENGL 101 and ITEC 103

Introduction to Digital Media, three credit hours course allows students to learn and understand the basics of Digital Media. The course content discusses various technologies that will aid students to learn the language of visual imagery. The applications that will be focused on industry standard applications for many graphic design positions. In this course, students will build a blog as a means of communicating and presenting their work as producing print and digital layouts to a wide audience.

COMM 212 - Media Writing

Pre-requisite(s): ENGL 101

This course introduces learners to the basic norms, values, standards and practices for writing for the mass media.

COMM 215 - Feature Writing
3 Semester Credit Hours - Prerequisite course(s): COMM 212

This course is designed to give students experience in recognizing and producing high-quality feature articles. Course materials and lectures will cover the basics of writing the newspaper and magazine feature story. Students will be exposed to, and write in, a diverse variety of approaches and techniques.

COMM 222 - Intercultural Mass Communication

Pre-requisite(s): COMM 110

This course explores the communication strategies and techniques within a specific cultural milieu and how those strategies and techniques differ among various cultural milieu, and learners practice in a variety of communication modes how best to accommodate their rhetorical strategies in communicating to both intracultural and intercultural audiences.

COMM 223 - Globalization and Media Cultures

Pre-requisite(s): COMM 110

Learners in this course apply communication strategies to and investigate real-world case study challenges with a global worldview of various issues of global media cultures. Students learn how to develop a Weltanschauung from which to best communicate in modern technologies with world audience.

COMM 311 - Media Law and Ethics
3 Semester Credit Hours
Prerequisite(s): COMM 111

Learners engage the philosophical underpinnings of ethics and the core principles of journalism and mass communication to develop an understanding and appreciation of the field’s normative ethical values. Students will learn how to apply an ethical decision-making framework to a variety of challenges.

COMM 321 - Theories of Media Communication 

Pre-requisite(s): COMM 111

Learners identify the major concepts, issues, and theories of media communication, and learners identify and use communication theories in a variety of best practices to demonstrate effective use of the theories learned in the course.

COMM 391 - Communication Research Methodology
2 Semester Credit Hours

This course provides an introduction to research methods and the philosophical underpinnings of research inquiry in the field of communication. It includes the topic adherence, overviews of quantitative, qualitative, and mixed-method research methodologies, a range of alternative research methods, including observation, archival research, questionnaire surveys, case studies, and experimentation, research design, data collection, and data analysis, the ethical implications of rese

COMM 492 - Mass Media and Public Opinion
3 Semester Credit Hours
Corequisite(s): COMM 321 and COMM 391

This course is designed to prepare students to be informed and critical consumers of polls and media coverage of them, to introduce students to basic theories and findings regarding the influence of mass media on public opinion, to provide students with firsthand experience in conducting and writing about public opinion research.

COMM 214 - New Media and Digital Culture

Pre-requisite(s): COMM 111 and COMM 113

This course examines the cultural impact of new digital technologies, such as the Internet and new telephone and audiovisual media. Students survey the origins of digital communication and the Internet; and they are introduced to contemporary scholarship on digital technologies, the Internet, and the institutions that control these technologies.

COMM 224 - Visual Storytelling
3 Semester Credit Hours
Prerequisite(s): COMM 113

This course combines storytelling arts with social, mobile, and digital media technologies. In this course, students apply digital storytelling theory and techniques to write, produce and publish digital stories. They integrate images, text, video and audio to create digital stories, and acquire competency in the use of digital media applications.

COMM 323 - Advanced Journalism

Pre-requisite(s): COMM 111, COMM 213, and COMM 311

This course will engage learners in the values, norms and professional practices newsgathering and writing. Emphasis is on traditional reporting methods, including interviewing and observation, and on the ethical, reliable presentation of news in print/digital formats.

COMM 334 - Communication Transformation

Pre-requisite(s): COMM 323

This course introduces multimedia production skills to students. Learners integrate text, audio, photos and video to produce online media packages that are attractive, accessible, easy to navigate, and appropriate for the platform and the audience.

COMM 423 - Digital Practicum 

Pre-requisite(s): COMM 323

This course allows students to explore magazine-style writing, editing, and presentation in the digital environment. Students collectively produce an online, magazine-style, publication.

COMM 424 - Capstone: Multimedia Storytelling

Pre-requisite(s): COMM 423; Co-requisite: COMM 322

In this course, learners apply skills in newsgathering, writing, and multimedia to produce an individual and a group project of publication quality that demonstrates their proficiency in multimedia storytelling.

UNIV 390 - Internship (3 credits, 180 - 240 hours of work experience)

Pre-requisite(s): Completion of 90 credits and CGPA greater than 2.0

Approved, monitored work experience providing the opportunity to apply concepts and theories learned in the classroom to actual practice in the workplace, in order to develop skills and to gain experience and knowledge for future employment. Students must apply for an internship a semester before the summer of the internship and comply with all requirements outlined in the Internship Manual.

COMM 214 - New Media and Digital Culture

Pre-requisite(s): COMM 111 and COMM 113

This course examines the cultural impact of new digital technologies, such as the Internet and new telephone and audiovisual media. Students survey the origins of digital communication and the Internet; and they are introduced to contemporary scholarship on digital technologies, the Internet, and the institutions that control these technologies.

COMM 221 - Communication Analysis and Criticism

This course investigates media through a variety of theories and methods. The focus will be on some of the dominant critical perspectives that have contributed to our understanding of media and its role in society. The course provides the basic vocabulary and concepts used to analyze different types of media. The aim of this course is to explore, understand, and effectively apply various schools of media criticism through reading, watching, discussing, and writing a wide range of media texts.

COMM 224 - Visual Storytelling
3 Semester Credit Hours
Prerequisite(s): COMM 113

This course combines storytelling arts with social, mobile, and digital media technologies. In this course, students apply digital storytelling theory and techniques to write, produce and publish digital stories. They integrate images, text, video and audio to create digital stories, and acquire competency in the use of digital media applications.

COMM 322 - Digital Resources and Content

Co-requisite: COMM 212

This course allows learners to explore the Internet for data; to assess data found online; to produce “value-added” research from online databases; and, to understand the principles behind turning original data into a useable online resource

COMM 450 - Selected Topics in Communication
3 Semester Credit Hours
Prerequisite(s): COMM 223

This course explores contemporary issues in communication theory, research, and practice and deal with specific media and PR issues or trends. Topics, ideas, and issues not taught in the standard courses are investigated. (Writing Intensive Course)

FREN 101 - Beginner Level French Language and Culture I

Pre-requisites: None

FREN 101 is the first course in a four-course beginner and intermediate French language sequence. The course has been designed for students who have no prior knowledge of the French Language and will be conducted in French as much as possible in order to foster skills in listening, speaking, reading, writing, and promote cultural awareness.

FREN 102 - Beginner Level French Language and Culture II

Pre-requisites: FREN 101

FREN 102 is the second course in a four-course beginner and intermediate French language sequence. The course has been designed for students who have completed FREN 101; it aims to foster skills in listening, speaking, reading, and writing, as well as to promote cultural awareness. The course will be conducted in French as much as possible.

FREN 201 - Intermediate French I

Pre-requisite(s): FREN 102

This is the third course in a four-course beginner and intermediate French language sequence. The course is a continuation of FREN 102. Not unlike 101 and 102, the course continues to foster skills in listening, speaking, reading, and writing, as well as to promote cultural awareness. Particular attention is paid to vocabulary development and applied grammar.

FREN 202 - Intermediate French II

Pre-requisite(s): FREN 201

This is the fourth course in a four-course beginner and intermediate French language sequence. The course is a continuation of FREN 102. The course aims to foster skills in listening, speaking, reading, and writing, as well as to promote cultural awareness. Students will read a variety of texts and should be able to express themselves with some fluency on a variety of topics by the end of the course.

FREN 220 - Special Topics in French Culture and Civilization

Pre-requisite(s): FREN 202

Complementing the four course beginner and intermediate sequence in French Language and Culture, FREN 220 critically examines specific topics relating to French culture and intellectual history. Topics of focus may include, but are not limited to, French and the Media, French in the MENA region, and francophone literature and film. FREN 220 is the capstone course in the beginner and intermediate language sequence in French. The course is taught as much as possible in French.

ARAB 101 Beginner Level Arabic and Culture for non-Native Learners I

Pre-requisite: None

Beginner Level Arabic Language and Culture 1 is the first in a four-course beginner and intermediate Arabic language sequence specifically tailored to the needs of non-native Arabic language students in the English and Mass Communication Programs (though any non-native learner of Arabic may enroll). This course introduces the student to the Arabic alphabet and the basics of reading and writing in Modern Standard Arabic (MSA). Instruction in the language is enriched by reference to cultural themes and visits to sites of cultural importance.

ARAB 102 - Beginner Level Arabic – II

Pre-requisite(s): ARAB 101

Beginner Level Arabic II is a direct continuation of Beginner Level Arabic I. This course is designed to enhance the reading, speaking and listening skills. With this course, students can increase their vocabulary and improve their grammar in Arabic.

ARAB 201 - Intermediate Arabic I

Pre-requisite(s): ARAB 102

The course provides an introduction to academic sources of the language. This program is specially designed to teach Arabic to university level Arabic students.

ARAB 202 - Intermediate Arabic II

Pre-requisite(s): ARAB 201

Students engage in simple Arabic conversation on a range of everyday subjects so students properly introduce themselves, and engage in simple conversation on a range of everyday topics. Building upon the basic foundation provided in Level 1, topics include the definite article. Proper pronunciation and listening skills continue to be emphasized. In addition, readings and exposure to Arabic culture, students demonstrate further competence with structure and the pattern of words and sentences.

ARAB 311 - Upper Intermediate Level Arabic Language and Culture for Native Arabic Speakers I

Pre-requisite: Arabic Placement Test

Upper Intermediate Level Arabic Language and Culture I is the first course in a four course sequence for the native Arabic speaker. All courses in the sequence are taught in Modern Standard Arabic (MSA). The course is designed to provide native Arabic-speakers with higher level linguistic skills in writing, reading, speaking, and listening. Emphasis is placed on grammar review, vocabulary acquisition, and composition. This course (and the subsequent sequence of courses) is tailored particularly to students interested in Arabic-English translation in the English Language and Mass Communication Programs.

ARAB 312 - Upper Intermediate Level Arabic Language and Culture for Native Arabic Speakers II

Pre-requisite: ARAB 311

Upper Intermediate Level Arabic Language and Culture II is a direct continuation of ARAB 311. It is designed to provide Arabic-speaking Translation and Mass Communications majors with the linguistic skills (writing, reading, speaking, listening) that serve as a solid foundation to the journalistic expression in Arabic. Emphasis is placed on grammar review, vocabulary acquisition, and composition.

ARAB 411 - Advanced Level Arabic Language and Culture for Native Arabic Speakers I

Pre-requisite(s): ARAB 312

This is a direct continuation of Arabic 312. The course substantially expands students’ existing vocabulary and capability of expression, both orally and in writing. Literary texts of increasing sophistication are used in the course.

ARAB 412 - Advanced Level Arabic Language and Culture for Native Arabic Speakers II

Pre-requisite: ARAB 411

Advanced Level Arabic Language and Culture for Native Arabic Speakers II is a direct continuation of ARAB 411 and represents the fourth course in the Arabic Language and Culture for native speakers’ sequence. This course provides a survey of themes and genres of Arabic literature from the mid- 19th century to the present. While focus will be on content, students will continue their acquisition of MSA through written and oral assignments designed for their advanced level of competency.

ARAB 420 - Special Topics in Arab Culture and Civilization for Native Arabic Speakers

Pre-requisite: ARAB 412

Supplementing the four course sequence in Arabic Language and Culture for native speakers, ARAB 420 will be taught in MSA. The course critically examines issues, values, and institutions of the contemporary Arab world primarily through analysis and discussion of current events. While focus will be on content, students will continue their acquisition of Modern Standard Arabic through written and oral assignments designed for their level of competency.